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Monday, July 24, 2017

The Amphicar

The Amphicar was the only amphibious automobile ever mass-produced for sale to the public. The German vehicle was designed by Hanns Trippel, creator of the war-time Schwimmwagen and manufactured by the Quandt Group at L├╝beck and at Berlin-Borsigwalde. Its name is a combination of "amphibious" and "car".

This Amphicar was photographed in Saskatoon on the South Saskatchewan River


This Amphicar was photographed** in Saskatoon on the South Saskatchewan River
This Amphicar was photographed** in Saskatoon on the South Saskatchewan River

The powerplant was the 1.1 L (1147 cc/69 in³) engine from the British Triumph Herald. This engine predated the Triumph Slant-4, which was also found in the early SAAB 99. It comes with a power output of 43 hp (32 kW) at 4750 rpm. Called the "Model 770", the Amphicar could achieve speeds of 7 knots in the water and 70 mph (113 km/h) on land. Nevertheless, some would comment that it wasn't a very good car and not a very good boat either because of this modest performance in or out of water.

Production started in 1961, after 1963, cars were assembled from the parts which had been supplied for the over-estimated sales of 20,000 per year, and production ended in 1968. Most cars were sold in the United States. Cars were sold in the UK from 1964. Total production was 3,878 vehicles before the company folded.

Amphicars were plagued with reliability problems, including faulty waterproofing on the engine that occasionally caused it to seize while driving through water (just in case, Amphicars came with an oar) and rapid corrosion of most surfaces. The vehicles have been described as "marginal in water, and not too fun on land", due to the bathtub shaped structure. However, they are one of the few amphibious production cars. The amphicar works well in snow, but has many limitations otherwise.

*Wikipedia

--more--> http://www.amphicar.com/history.htm

**Photo Credit D. B. Austen

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