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Friday, July 03, 2020

Daddy Cut the Big One!

Click here

Click above

Quoth The "Scotsman"

Dr. McCoy: "Well, Scotty, now you've done it!"


Scotty: "Aye. The haggis is in the fire for shure."

Art of Steve Walker

One Family's Values

"One Family's Values"
Click on the picture to goto his fanpages on facebook and see his art

BIOGRAPHY: Drawing is one of Steve Walker's earliest childhood memories. He recollects drawing pictures from about the age of three or four years old. Drawing came naturally to the Toronto artist, and his love of the art form continued into his adulthood. As a self taught artist, Walker only began painting after a trip to Europe when he was 25 years old. During the trip, he spent much of his time in Europe touring the great galleries and museums. In his words it was the first time he was exposed to great painting, and the first time he recognized the potential power of the art form. "I was moved by something that I was capable of doing," he said. His first paintings were done in a somewhat secretive way, as he had no intention of exhibiting or selling, and had no aspirations of becoming a professional artist.

Producing art about his life and the lives of those around him is as natural to Walker as his first childhood drawings. As a gay man, Walker is acutely aware that he is living during a period of history that is both the best of times and the worst of times. There is more freedom and acceptance for gay men and women, while at the same time AIDS has devastated the gay population.

But Walker's paintings are not about gay people or homosexuality. He describes his art as being about love, hate, pain, joy, touch, communication, beauty, loneliness, attraction, hope, despair, life and death. His art includes universal themes regardless of race, gender, socio-economic class, culture or sexual orientation. However, his work is unique because he conveys these themes through the subjects in his paintings, young gay men. "Remove the gender of the painting's subjects and what we have is human relationships in general, and one's relationship to the world itself," he said. "As a homosexual I have been moved, educated, and inspired by works that deal with a heterosexual context. Why would I assume that a heterosexual would be incapable of appreciating work that speaks to common themes in life, as seen through my eyes as a gay man. If the heterosexual population is unable to do this, then the loss is theirs, not mine."

If Walker were an abstract painter or a landscape artist, he says his sexual orientation wouldn't matter. But since his paintings are about gay life, his sexual orientation becomes more important than his cultural background, age, or nationality.

The focus of his paintings often depict sadness and loneliness to reflect the reality that much of anyone's life is sad and lonely. Walker often portrays people in relationships as separate entities because that is the way he views them. He also uses a small and consistent palette of colours because he is comfortable with them and the colours provide the desired results. "Colour is very powerful and a little can go a long way if used effectively," he said. "Some colours are very exciting to me, while others are quite offensive. Painting flesh is very exciting because of the huge variations possible within a very small colour range."

Walker's artworks are very large, always measuring 36" by 48". He creates large paintings because he believes that a large image is more appealing than a smaller one. "Whether it's a television screen, cinema screen, or an image in a magazine, the size of the image connotes a degree of importance," he said. Walker said belonging to an oppressed minority group has been a driving force in creating his art. "Any minority wants and needs to find artistic voices that reflect their own personal situations, and, in doing so, validate and record their lives and cultures for themselves, and for the larger world," he said.

Walker said he experiences many small rewards during the creative process. "After hours of painting, I stand back and look at something that wasn't there before -- a hand, face, or piece of fabric will exist where there was once a blank canvas," he said.

As an artist, Walker said it's exciting to be working at a point in history where there is an audience ready to appreciate and consume his creations. "It is very rare to find success as an artist in your lifetime," he said. "My work will be around long after me, but seeing it affect people at the time that I am creating it is very rewarding."

In recent years Steve Walker's work has been exhibited in galleries in Toronto, Montreal, New York, Philadelphia and Key West.

The gay community of North America has responded very positively to Walker's art. "I am very aware of the appreciation from a group of people who recognize the time, energy and talent devoted to a body of work that speaks specifically to them but at the same time exists in the larger world that we all live in," he said.

&#185 ho·mo·e·rot·ic ( hō ' mō-ĭ-rŏt ' ĭk ) adj. Of or concerning homosexual love and
desire. Tending to arouse such desire.

Microwaving butter...

Microwaving butter...

How many blocks are missing from the cube?

Toilet Rules

Thursday, July 02, 2020

Meanwhile, 75 Years Later...

The Queer Urban Orchestra

Seen on a sub near you...

Are you serious?!?!? So after leaving the drive thru today in Jax Beach, FL my wife took her sandwich out of the bag and we see THIS!! Seriously? Oh not today, not today!! I went back to the restaurant, went INSIDE (already fuming), asked to speak to the manager and then threw the sandwich on the counter. I asked him for an explanation. He looked confused, so I pointed at the writing on the sandwich and demanded that he tells me why someone felt the need to write it on my Wife’s sandwich. He answered, "because you ordered a BLT with cheese??” To which I replied “Oh” 😶

With a little help from my friends - The Muppets & James Corden

In Liverpool, I think

13 Strange Canadian Laws You’ve Never Heard Of

Think you’re a law-abiding citizen? It’s possible you’ve broken one of these strange Canadian laws without even realizing it.


Think you’re a law-abiding Canadian?

You’d be surprised to learn what’s against the law in Canada. For example, recently a Toronto businessman found that to sell edible underwear in his “adult entertainment” store, he’d need a food license. Who knew? Here are 13 more strange Canadian laws you never knew existed.

Click here to goto Reader's Digest

Wednesday, July 01, 2020

Happy Canada Day!

153 Years Young!

Strong and Free, 2000

Together we are Canada

My name is British Columbia
The jewel of the West Coast.
Forestry and fishing are
The things that I do most

Hi, I am Alberta
A wild west kind of place
With cows and oil and mountains
And lots of open space.

I am Manitoba
And I’m Saskatchewan
We’re the golden prairies
Where fields of wheat grow in the sun

Hi, I am Ontario
The home of government
To me each year the leaders
Of our democracy are sent.

Bonjour, I am Quebec
Here French is my language too
When I want to ask “how are you?”
I say, “comment t’allez vous?”

Newfoundland, New Brunswick
And Nova Scotia -- those are we,
We are Atlantic Provinces
The three musketeers of the sea.

I’m Prince Edward Island
And I know I may be small
But without me all the rest of you
Would have no potatoes at all.

The Yukon, Nunavut and North West
Territories are up north.
Through ice and cold and polar bears
Few brave souls venture forth.

Together we are Canada
One nation strong and free
With sharing, friends and happiness
Forever we will be!

Under the Rainbow, 2000

*Art by Steve Walker, Fans of Steve Walker's Art

Haha!

hula hoop

Love-Sex-Friendship (Venn Diagram)

Love-Sex-Friendship  -Venn Diagram

Saskatchewan Government Announces Cutbacks:

Affects Cities of: Regina and Saskatoon. Towns like Dog River and Woolerton, SK, may benefit.

As part of the cutbacks for 2020/2021, the snow equipment budget had to be realigned. Here is a picture of our new model:


No one in the big cities were available for comment, so The Wizard left for Dog River to get an exclusive comment from cornerstone resident and big business owner, Brent Leroy.

Brent Leroy, owner of Dog River's Corner Gas, (Gas and Convenience Store), reacts to the news:

"Yeah! I just read that in 'The Howler', eh?. It's just great! Before last year when we achieved official 'Town Status', (A whole bunch of Hollywood freaks came here to do some sort of nature film -- can you believe it? Here in Dog River, eh?! They just said to just keep on doing what we normally do, talk as if they weren't there. And they even paid us as 'extras'! I was able to buy a few more chili cheese dogs than before. That $10 sure came in handy! Who da thunk that they would be so intested in filming grass and such?)."
"Anyways, we did not even have a budget. Now we have a budget! Now Hank won't have to use his dirty hoe to clean up the street and sidewalk in Dog River. Myrtle will be so happy. You know last year she slipped on the sidewalk and broke her hip. (If that happened this year there'd be hell to pay. -oh. Can I say that? You know between you and me, I think she gets hooked on the painkillers, eh?.)"

"Anyways, Woolerton [spits], doesn't need one of those new plows. They only have one street! Just make sure that they don't add some kind of food tax and force a cut in Lacey's budget at The Ruby... I need my Chili-Cheese Dogs!"

"Above is me and Lacey celebrating with our first checks from the movie fella. Oh, and we rent movies."

13 AWESOME THINGS YOU DIDN'T KNOW WERE MADE IN CANADA



The Canadian Flag

Forget Labatt’s beer and maple syrup. Canadians have created plenty of awesome and strange stuff, and here are 13 things you probably didn’t know were proudly made in Canada

While hockey players and great beer may be Canada’s favourite exports, there are actually tons of great Canadian products used around the world every day. And while everybody knows the telephone was invented in Canada, how many people know that 95 per cent of the world’s Lentils come from Saskatchewan, or that we make more submarines than most countries combined?


1. Did You Know Most of the World's French Fries Come from New Brunswick?

New Brunswick-based McCain Foods makes one-third of all the frozen French fries produced in the world, and many come from a $65-million state-of-the art potato processing plant that’s in Florenceville-Bristol. The small town in western New Brunswick has taken on the moniker ‘The French Fry Capital of the World.’ Not surprisingly, this is the location of the Potato World museum, and the heart of the mid-July National French Fry Day celebrations.




2. Did You Know Carlton Place Makes the World's Best Baseball Bats?

In 2012, more than 100 Major League Baseball players chose to swing Canadian maple wood bats - better known as the "Sam Bat". Sam Holman, founder of the The Original Maple Bat Corporation, invented the bat by choosing maple wood, a harder wood than the traditionally used ash. So, if you see a professional player with a little logo on their baseball bat, that’s one of the 18,000 sluggers produced each year in Carlton Place, a half-hour from Ottawa.




3. Did You Know Saskatchewan Makes Most of the World's Lentils?

Mmmm, Lentils! Whether home or travelling abroad, order some lentil soup and odds are you’re getting a little taste of home. Canada is the largest exporter of green lentils in the world - about 1.5 million metric tonnes annually, with 95% of it coming from Saskatchewan.



4. Did You Know Scarborough Makes Most of the World's Halls?

If you pick up a pack of Halls you’ll be getting another little taste of home since they are made in Scarborough, Ontario. The plant at Bertrand produced more than 6 billion pieces of “medicine” for the U.S. last year – enough that if you lined them side-by-side they would circle the earth at the equator approximately 3.4 times.



5. Did You Know Winnipeg Mints Coins for Over 60 Countries?

Canada produces currency for more countries than you can imagine! The Royal Winnipeg Mint produces coins for 60 different countries, including Centavos for Cuba, kroner for Norway, and pesos for Colombia. Currently the mint can produce over 20 million coins a day.



6. Did You Know Hamilton Makes the World's Swedish Fish?

Those chewy Swedish Fish sure weren’t made in Sweden! More than 5 billion of the colourful little candies are produced in Hamiltion, Ontario every year – that’s all of the Swedish Fish consumed in North America. Every day about 13 million of the little fish are produced at a factory in Hamilton, which also makes all Maynards Candy for Canada, and key brands for the U.S., including Sour Patch Kids.



7. Did You Know Toronto Makes the World's Best Racing Bikes?

Using the same tools and techniques as Formula One teams, Toronto-basedCervélo builds what have been called the world’s fastest and lightest bikes. At the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, athletes riding Cervélo bikes won 10 medals, while in 2008 Carlos Sastre rode a Cervélo bike to win le Tour de France.



8. Did you Know Winnipeg Makes Most of the World's Scratch Cards?

Walk into almost any corner store in the world for an instant win lottery ticket, and there’s a good chance your scratch card was printed by Winnipeg company Pollard Banknote. Founded in 1907, Pollard now has facilities throughout North America, however a significant amount of its lottery scratch cards are still made in Canada.



9. Did You Know the World's Best Cymbals come from New Brunswick?

Where do the cymbals used by Rush, Keith Harris of the Black Eyed Peas, the Philadelphia Orchestra and marching bands around the world come from? The small village of Meductic (population 300), located along the Saint John River in southern New Brunswick. SABIAN cymbals are sold in 120 countries around the world.



10. Did You Know Trenton Makes Tons of Dinos?

No, they don't make dinosaurs like in Jurassic Park, but close. Research Casting International, the leading company for constructing dinosaur remains (casting, restoring, mounting, repairing), is located in a 45,000 sq.ft. airplane-hanger-sized building in Trenton, Ontario. The company has created more than 750 of the mighty beasts for museums around the world.



11. Did You Know Kelowna Makes Most of the World's Water Slides?

When you slip down one of those clear tube water slides on a Disney Cruise, you’re likely using Canadian design and technology. Canada’s Whitewater West Industries Ltd. is the largest water parks attraction company in the world. Their Kelowna, B.C. facility, FormaShape, makes thousands of water slides each year.



12. Did You Know Peterborough is the Custom Aircraft Capital of Canada?

Flying Colours Corp. of Peterborough, Ontario doesn’t make airplanes, but they sure make them special. Entertainment systems, corporate logos, iPad-holders, custom exterior paint, upholstery, and they’ve even added a permanent bed in an aft cabin. Everything is custom made in-house, from the leather seats and wood trim to the side walls – for customers from across the globe, including much of Europe, the Middle East, Russia, Asia, and India.



13. Did you know B.C. Makes Tons of Submarines?

Atlantis Submarines, of British Columbia, actually owns more submarines than many countries – but these ones are used for tourism. The Canadian company initiated the world’s first commercial tourist submarine in the Cayman Islands in 1986. More than 10 million people have since experienced underwater adventures in their 48 and 64 passenger submarines in the Caribbean and Pacific. The subs they operate in Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Aruba, St. Martin, Cozumel, Curacao & Guam were all made in Canada.


CANADA!!!


CANADA!!!!

Canada is huge. It spans six time zones from "Sea to Sea to Sea" and is the world's second largest country with an area of 9, 970, 610 square kilometres (3, 849,656 square miles).

Borders:

Canada is surrounded by three oceans - the Pacific Ocean to the west, the Atlantic Ocean to the east and the Arctic Ocean to the north. To the south is the United States of America, which shares almost 9,000 kilometres of undefended border with Canada.

Provinces and Territories:

Ottawa, located in the province of Ontario, is the capital of Canada. Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories, each with its own capital city:

Alberta - Edmonton

British Columbia - Victoria

Manitoba - Winnipeg

New Brunswick - Fredericton

Newfoundland & Labrador - St. John's

Northwest Territories - Yellowknife

Nova Scotia - Halifax

Nunavut - Iqaluit

Ontario - Toronto

Prince Edward Island - Charlottetown

Quebec - City of Québec

Saskatchewan - Regina

Yukon Territory - Whitehorse

Population:

30,750,100 people living in Canada

Distribution: 77% urban, 23% rural

Aboriginal Peoples: North American Indian 69%, Métis 26%, Inuit 5%

Official Languages: English and French

Languages Spoken: English 59%, French 23%, Other 18%
For detailed Canadian Statistics check the Statistics Canada Web site.

Political System:

Canada is a federal parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarchy. The Canadian parliamentary system is modeled after the British form of government and consists of the Crown, Senate and House of Commons.

The Crown, or Queen, is the traditional Head of State who is represented in Canada by the Governor General. The Crown delegates authority to the Governor General, who acts on her behalf in a mostly symbolic role as the Head of State. The office of the Governor General is one of Canada's oldest institutions, dating back almost 400 years.

The Senate, or Upper House, consists of 105 members appointed by the Governor General upon the advice of the Prime Minister. The Senate and House of Commons share similar authorities, but only the House of Commons can introduce financial legislation. The House of Commons, or Lower House, is the primary legislative body of Parliament representing 301 Canadian electoral districts.

Every five years voters elect local members to the House of Commons and the political party with the most representatives forms the government. The party leader becomes the Head of Government or Prime Minister; The Right Honourable Paul Martin is the current and twentieth-first Prime Minister.

Get detailed information about the history and function of Parliament. Learn more about the office of the Prime Minister or role of the Governor General.

National Emblem

Historically, Canada's most important national emblem has been the maple leaf. The maple leaf, in variant forms and colours, has appeared on the penny, Canadian coats of arms and regimental banners. In 1965 the maple leaf became the central design on the Canadian national flag. The red maple leaf is recognized world-wide as a Canadian symbol.


Visit the Canadian Heritage Web site for more details about the national flag.

The Canadian Heritage Web site offers detailed information about other Canadian Symbols.


National Anthem of Canada

O Canada!
Our home and native land!
True patriot love
all of us command.

With glowing hearts
we see thee rise,
The True North strong and free!
From far and wide,
O Canada,
we stand on guard for thee.

God keep our land
glorious and free!
O Canada,
we stand on guard for thee.

O Canada,
we stand on guard for thee.

French Version

O Canada! Terre de nos aïeux,
Ton front est ceint de fleurons glorieux!

Car ton bras sait porter l'épée,
Il sait porter la croix!

Ton histoire est une épopée
Des plus brillants exploits.

Et ta valeur, de foi trempée,
Protégera nos foyers et nos droits.

Protégera nos foyers et nos droits.

Culture and Language

Canada's culture and official language policy are features that are unique to Canada. To learn more about culture, languages, education, communications and economy in Canada, take a look at the Canadian profile on the Canadian Heritage Web site.

Geography and Climate:

Canada's climate varies throughout the country. Each region experiences variable temperature and precipitation levels, although most of Canada experiences four distinct seasons.

  • Spring — Average temperature = 15 degrees Celsius





  • Summer — Average temperature = 25 degrees Celsius





  • Fall — Average temperature = 15 degrees Celsius





  • Winter — Average temperature = -25 degrees Celsius

    Like its climate, Canada has a diverse geography that varies regionally. Canada encompasses several geographical elements - from Arctic tundra in the north, lush rain forests in the west, the Prairie wheat fields in central Canada, to the rugged coastlines of the Atlantic and Pacific provinces.

    Canada has several distinct geographic and climatic regions:

    The Pacific or West Coast — enjoys Canada's most favourable climate. The warm Pacific Ocean air produces a temperate rain forest climate. The winters, although mild, include significant precipitation - particularly in southern British Columbia. The northern and interior regions, however, experience heavy snowfall.

    The Cordillera or Cordilleran mountain range, extends from British Columbia to Alberta and as far north as the Yukon. The Cordillera include the Coastal Range, the Rockies and St. Elias Mountains.

    The Prairies — encompass the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta from east to west. The Prairies, considered world leaders in grain production, are famous for their seemingly endless fields of grain.

    Prairie summers are hot and dry with little precipitation. Levels of precipitation vary somewhat across the region however, with annual rates ranging from 300 to 500 mm. The "chinook" winds of the Prairies counteract the long, cold winters producing milder temperatures, sometimes as much as 20 degrees in a matter of hours.

    The Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Region — is home to half of Canada's population. Summer temperatures average 20 degrees Celsius, but may feel considerably warmer with the humidity. Winters in this region are typically cold with heavy snowfall.

    This area has some of the best agricultural land in Canada. It is suitable for growing a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. The Niagara Peninsula region produces several quality wines. Maple syrup and sugar are other products of the Great Lakes region.

    The Atlantic or Maritime Region — experiences high levels of precipitation throughout the year due to the proximity of the Atlantic Ocean. The winters are characteristically cold with heavy periods of snowfall. During the summer temperatures may range from 16 to 18 degrees Celsius. Fog is prevalent in some Atlantic areas, particularly in the spring and summer.

    The North or Arctic Regions — is blanketed in snow much of the year. A northern summer consists of four months of perpetual sunlight with temperatures reaching 10 to 20 degrees Celsius, in the arctic and sub-arctic respectively. The summer permafrost allows for the growth of vegetative life. The long, cold winters, with very few hours of daylight, are brightened by The Northern Lights or Aurora Borealis.

    For more information about the Canadian climate, visit the Environment Canada Web site.

    Like many large countries, Canada has several time zones. Canada uses six Standard Time Zones and observes Daylight Savings Time in every province but Saskatchewan.

    National Parks and National Historic Sites:

    In 1885, the Canadian government established the first national park in Banff, Alberta. Today, there are more than forty National Parks that occupy approximately 2 percent of Canada's total landmass. Canada's National Park system is monitored and protected by Parks Canada. All levels of government recognize the urgency of preserving the ecological integrity of Canada's parks for generations to come.

    In addition, Parks Canada and Canadian Heritage strive to commemorate the people, places and events of national historic significance. Canada has designated more than 800 National Historic Sites throughout the country. These sites represent the variety of Canada's unique history, culture and people.

    Canada is also home to thirteen UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Countries worldwide share the responsibility of preserving sites of ecological or biological universal importance.



  • Picto-Word Game

    Tuesday, June 30, 2020

    a wise muppet, he is hrrr hrrr hrrr!

    a wise muppet, he is hrrr hrrr hrrr!

    10 Truly Bizzare Scientific Studies


    Where would the world be without scientific studies? I think most would agree that some can be very informative, some not so informative and others are just plain silly and a waste of money. The studies on this list are all rather unusual in nature, hopefully entertaining and each study was sourced at least twice on different websites. Some here I believe do have some merit while others will fall into the questionable category and the results may need to be taken with a grain of salt. The reason I have selected so many sexually oriented studies for this list is unknown and is perhaps worthy of another study. Click below to read about them.

    Big Hands, Big Feet, Big…

    Top 10 WTF? U.S. Sex Laws

    Top 10 WTF? U.S. Sex Laws
    Love the Porcupine one...

    Mad Cow

    DEFINITELY NOT SAFE FOR WORK! CONTAINS MULTIPLE INSTANCES OF THE "F" WORD! YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!
    Click here

    Click above. (Flash Movie)

    Good Point!!!


    Happiness keeps You Sweet,

    Trials keep You Strong,

    Sorrows keep You Human,

    Failures keep You Humble,

    Success keeps You Glowing,

    But Only God keeps You Going!

    You are so special!

    IF "GOD" EXISTS

    "GOD" ALLOWS EVIL
    "GOD" IS POWERLESS
    "GOD" IS A SADIST
    "GOD" IS BLIND
    "GOD" IS UNFEELING


    HE/SHE IS NOT MY "GOD"

    MY GODDESS AND GOD KNOW THE LIMITS OF THEIR POWER...

    THEY CANNOT HELP, NOR DO I EXPECT THAT FROM THEM.

    MY GODDESS/GOD HAVE NEVER PROMISED THAT WHICH THEY CANNOT DELIVER.

    MY GODDESS/GOD HAVE NOT LIED TO ME.

    I WAS TAUGHT THE 'OTHER' "GOD" IS GOOD.
    HE/SHE IS NOT...
    CANNOT
    DOES NOT
    EXIST...

    PFFT!

    Carl Reiner, 'The Dick Van Dyke Show' Creator and Hollywood Legend, Dead at 98

    R.I.P.
    Getty images

    Monday, June 29, 2020

    That's My Boy!

    A young Southern boy goes off to college, but about 1/3 way through the semester, he has foolishly squandered what money his parents gave him.

    Then he gets an idea. He calls his daddy. "Dad," he says, "you won't believe the wonders that modern education are coming up with! Why, they actually have a program here that will teach Ole Blue how to talk!"

    "That's absolutely amazing!" his father says. "How do I get him in that program?"

    "Just send him down here with $1000," the boy says, "I'll get him into the course."

    So, his father sends the dog and the $1000. About 2/3 way through the semester, the money runs out. The boy calls his father again.

    "So how's Ole Blue doing, son?" his father asks.

    "Awesome, dad, he's talking ! up a storm," he says, "but you just won't believe this - they've had such good results with this program, that they've implemented a new one to teach the animals how to READ!"

    "READ!?" says his father, "No kidding! What do I have to do to get him in that program?"

    "Just send $2,500, I'll get him in the class. "

    His father sends the money.

    The boy has a problem. At the end of the year, his father will find out that the dog can neither talk nor read. So he shoots the dog.

    When he gets home, his father is all excited. "Where's Ole Blue? I just can't wait to see him talk and read something!"

    "Dad," the boy says, "I have some grim news. This morning, when I got out of the shower, Ole Blue was in the living room kicking back in the recliner, reading the morning paper, like he usually does. Then he turned to me and asked, 'So, is your daddy still messin' around with that little redhead who lives on Oak Street?'

    The father says, "I hope you SHOT that son of a bitch before he talks to your Mother!"

    "I sure did, Dad!"

    "That's my boy"

    23 and 1/2 hours: What is the single best thing we can do for our health?

    Proof that the Irish discovered Africa

    Dad... Mom...

    Dad...Mom..I'm gay

    ubuntu

    10 Things To Be Grateful For